Muesli Stangen

Muesli stangen - healthy, tasty, simple breakfast bars

Muesli stangen - healthy, tasty, simple breakfast bars click to enlarge

Book of Buns

Book of Buns click to enlarge

All You Knead Is Bread

All You Knead Is Bread click to enlarge

What I am baking today - 9 December 2013

Muesli Stangen

Stangen means "rod" in German and that is a very unattractive name for a very attractive breakfast food (or lunch, tea, snack...).  These simple, tasty and healthy bars are superior in every way to dreadful breakfast bars that you buy.  They last well in a tin.  They freeze beautifully and in the holidays when we are both busy and over eating, they make the perfect food.  Trust me, I am a baker!

Ingredients (makes 10 biggish bars)

For the soaked muesli:

150 g muesli of your choice (I love Rude Health musli but any good quality, sugar free kind is great I like LOTS of fruit and nuts but appreciate you may not)
150 g cold water

For the dough:

300 g whole meal wheat or spelt flour (or a mix)
50 g dark or light rye flour
250 g water
1.5 g instant/3 g dry/6 g fresh yeast
6 g salt
2-3 tablespoon of molasses (treacle), honey, or maple syrup

To decorate:

More muesli

Method

Soak the muesli and water in a little bowl for at least an hour before you make the dough.

If you are using dry yeast, measure the flours into a big mixing bowl and make a well.  Sprinkle in the yeast and pour in 100 g of water.  Let it sit for 15 minutes.  A beige sludge may or may not form on the surface and that is all right.  As long as the yeast is thoroughly dissolved it will be fine.  Add all the other ingredients, excluding the soaked muesli, and bring them together into a ball in the bowl.  

If you are using fresh yeast, measure all the ingredients, excluding the muesli, into a big mixing bowl and bring them together into a big ball.

Turn the ball out on the counter and knead it for a good 10 minutes.  It will be sticky and that is ok.  Pop it back in the bowl, cover it and let it rest for 20 minutes.  Add in the muesli, squishing it into the dough - don’t worry, the dough will recover - and then cover it again with cling film. Let it rest on the counter for 2-3 hours (or overnight/all day in the fridge if you like).

Shape the buns

Preheat the oven to 220 degrees before you start as these buns do not require a second rise.

Fill a big dinner plate with more muesli.

Pull the very sticky dough out onto a lightly floured surface and divide it into 10 pieces which you roll gently into balls - it's soft and sticky but don't freak out.

One by one, pick up a piece and pop it on the plate with the musli. Roll the dough around in the musli gently and stretch it out with two hands at the same time in order to make a sausage about 10 cm long that is covered in musli.

Place this on a baking tray that you have lined with non stick baking parchment.

Repeat with the rest of the dough, leaving some space between each bun.

Flatten the buns slightly so they are no more than about 1.5 cm thick and then spray them liberally with water.  

Bake them for 20 minutes and cool them on a wire rack before eating. 

This recipe first appeared in The Book Of Buns, published in 2013.  And if you like these recipes, All You Knead Is Bread has even more great, global bread recipes.  It was published in 2012.  Both are available on Amazon.